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DocumentLong-term impact of early life stress on adult social behavior and prefrontal cortical circuits 2018

Reference code: PT/FB
Entity holding: BIAL Foundation
Location: S. Mamede do Coronado
Title:
BIAL Foundation Archive
Start date: 1994
History:
The BIAL Foundation was created in 1994 by Laboratórios BIAL in conjunction with the Council of Rectors of Portuguese Universities. BIAL’s Foundation mission is to foster the scientific study of Man from both the physical and spiritual perspectives.
Along the years the BIAL Foundation has developed an important relationship with the scientific community, first in Portugal and after worldwide. Today it is an institution of reference which aims to stimulate new researches that may help people, promote more health and contribute to new milestones to gain access to knowledge.
Among its activities the BIAL Foundation manages the BIAL Award, created in 1984, one of the most important awards in the Health field in Europe. The BIAL Award rewards both the basic and the clinical research distinguishing works of major impact in medical research.
The BIAL Foundation also assigns Scientific Research Scholarships for the study of neurophysiological and mental health in people, arousing the interest of researchers in the areas of Psychophysiology and Parapsychology.
To date the BIAL Foundation has supported 461 projects, more than 1000 researchers, with research groups in twenty-seven countries, resulting, until April 2013, in about 600 full papers, out of which 172 published in indexed international journals with an average impact factor of 3.6 and a substantial number of citations (1665).
Since 1996 the BIAL Foundation organizes the Symposia entitled "Behind and Beyond the Brain", a Forum that gathers well renowned neurosciences speakers and the BIAL Foundation Fellows which are spread around the world.
Classified as an institution of public utility, the BIAL Foundation includes among its patrons the Portuguese President, the Portuguese Universities Rectors' Council and the Portuguese Medical Association.
URL: http://www.bial.com/pt/
Accessibility: By permission

Reference code: PT/FB/BL
Entity holding: BIAL Foundation
Title: BIAL Grants
Start date: 1994
History:
In 1994 the BIAL Foundation launched a programme of science research grants with the aim of encouraging the research into Man’s physical and mental processes, namely in fields still largely unexplored but which warrant further scientific analysis, as Psychophysiology and Parapsychology.
Since its launch, applications to the BIAL grants have been increasing. Up to now 461 projects have been supported, involving more than 1000 researchers from 27 countries.
The approved applications have benefited from grants in amounts comprised between €5,000 and €50, 000. The amount to be granted is fixed by the Scientific board according to the needs of each project.
The supported projects have originated, until April 2013, in about 600 full papers, 172 out of which were published in indexed international journals with an average impact factor of 3.6 and a substantial number of citations (1665).
Among the BIAL Foundation fellows is worth highlighting the presence of scientists from prestigious universities from the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, Russia, Germany, Japan, France, Canada, and many others.
The BIAL grants are promoted biannually.

Reference code: PT/FB/BL-2016
Location: BF-GMS
Title:
2016 Grants
Start date: 2017-01

Reference code: PT/FB/BL-2016-266
Location: BF-GMS
Title:
266 - Early life stress and social hierarchies: The role of cortico-striatal circuits
Duration: 2017-01 - 2021-01
Researcher(s):
João Peça, Joana Guedes, Ana Luísa Cardoso, Mohammed Hussien, Lara Franco, Mário Carvalho
Institution(s): Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal)
Contents: Contents:
Application form
Correspondence
Research Funding Agreement
Progress report
Final report
Author: Peça, J.
Secondary author(s):
Guedes, J., Cardoso, A. L., Hussien, M., Franco, L., Carvalho, M.
Number of reproductions:
1
Keywords:
Animal behavior / Social hierarchy / Stress / Optogenetics / Psychophysiology

Reference code: PT/FB/BL-2016-266.05
Location: BF-GMS
Title:
Long-term impact of early life stress on adult social behavior and prefrontal cortical circuits
Publication year: 2018
URL:
http://eds.b.ebscohost.com/eds/detail/detail?vid=2&sid=7efd6eec-2b7b-4d9e-9cd5-a4eee8c094c2%40pdc-v-sessmgr06&bdata=Jmxhbmc9cHQtcHQmc2l0ZT1lZHMtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#AN=ibu.b2775902&db=cat01014a
Abstract/Results: ABSTRACT:
Prolonged exposure to stressful conditions in early life imparts changes to physiology and health and may trigger or exacerbate neuropsychiatric disorders. Overt dysfunction in sociability is also a hallmark of disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia. Likewise, abnormal social interaction in otherwise healthy individuals is itself a trigger for mental health disorders. In addition, for most social animals, the relative position an individual occupies in its social hierarchy strongly modulates psychosocial stress.
Early life stress (ELS) induced by maternal separation is acknowledged to have long-term effects on animal behavior and is considered one of the most potent, naturally-occurring stressors. In humans, childhood adversity, neglect or mistreatment is known to increase the risk for psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety. In rodent models of maternal separation, behavioral deficits are observed in emotional behavior and stress responses. At the same time, neurological dysfunctions have been identified in both humans and mice exposed to ELS. However, the precise neuronal substrates and mechanisms that traduce ELS into altered neuronal activity and subsequent social dysfunction in adulthood are poorly understood. While the role of stress impacting adult animals and promoting changes to social behavior and social hierarchies is well described, the influence of ELS on adult social hierarchical rank and social behaviors remains largely unknown. Our results uncovered that ELS induces a dysfunction in social hierarchy and social interactions in mice. We observed that ELS mice display a lower social rank when compared to control animals and are more easily defeated in dominant-subordinate competitions. ELS also led to long-lasting functional alterations in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), as evidenced by an increased c-fos expression in response to social dominance stimuli.
Additionally, neuronal atrophy and increased inhibitory synaptic strength were observed in mPFC neurons from adult mice that experience ELS. In terms of gene expression in the mPFC, we found that the mRNA of Npy1r was upregulated in ELS mice and also in wild-type subordinate animals, suggesting a role for this gene in behaviors regulating social dominance.
Together, our data suggests that ELS leads to long-lasting alterations in gene expression and to altered mPFC activity, inducing a subordinate behavior within a social hierarchy. Lastly, we proposed Npy1r signaling as a key modulator of social rank and a potential therapeutic target for social dysfunctions.
Accessibility: Document exists in file
Copyright/Reproduction:
By permission
Language:
eng
Author:
Franco, L.
Document type:
Doctoral thesis
Number of reproductions:
1
Reference:
Franco, L. (2018). Long-term impact of early life stress on adult social behavior and prefrontal cortical circuits (Unpublished doctoral thesis). Institute for Interdisciplinary Research of the University of Coimbra, Portugal.
Indexed document: No
Keywords: Early life stress / Maternal separation / Social hierarchy / Social subordination / Social subordination / Npy1r

DocumentThe impact of early life stress throughout life: Maternal separation-induced changes in behavior and microglia morphology2018

Reference code: PT/FB
Entity holding: BIAL Foundation
Location: S. Mamede do Coronado
Title:
BIAL Foundation Archive
Start date: 1994
History:
The BIAL Foundation was created in 1994 by Laboratórios BIAL in conjunction with the Council of Rectors of Portuguese Universities. BIAL’s Foundation mission is to foster the scientific study of Man from both the physical and spiritual perspectives.
Along the years the BIAL Foundation has developed an important relationship with the scientific community, first in Portugal and after worldwide. Today it is an institution of reference which aims to stimulate new researches that may help people, promote more health and contribute to new milestones to gain access to knowledge.
Among its activities the BIAL Foundation manages the BIAL Award, created in 1984, one of the most important awards in the Health field in Europe. The BIAL Award rewards both the basic and the clinical research distinguishing works of major impact in medical research.
The BIAL Foundation also assigns Scientific Research Scholarships for the study of neurophysiological and mental health in people, arousing the interest of researchers in the areas of Psychophysiology and Parapsychology.
To date the BIAL Foundation has supported 461 projects, more than 1000 researchers, with research groups in twenty-seven countries, resulting, until April 2013, in about 600 full papers, out of which 172 published in indexed international journals with an average impact factor of 3.6 and a substantial number of citations (1665).
Since 1996 the BIAL Foundation organizes the Symposia entitled "Behind and Beyond the Brain", a Forum that gathers well renowned neurosciences speakers and the BIAL Foundation Fellows which are spread around the world.
Classified as an institution of public utility, the BIAL Foundation includes among its patrons the Portuguese President, the Portuguese Universities Rectors' Council and the Portuguese Medical Association.
URL: http://www.bial.com/pt/
Accessibility: By permission

Reference code: PT/FB/BL
Entity holding: BIAL Foundation
Title: BIAL Grants
Start date: 1994
History:
In 1994 the BIAL Foundation launched a programme of science research grants with the aim of encouraging the research into Man’s physical and mental processes, namely in fields still largely unexplored but which warrant further scientific analysis, as Psychophysiology and Parapsychology.
Since its launch, applications to the BIAL grants have been increasing. Up to now 461 projects have been supported, involving more than 1000 researchers from 27 countries.
The approved applications have benefited from grants in amounts comprised between €5,000 and €50, 000. The amount to be granted is fixed by the Scientific board according to the needs of each project.
The supported projects have originated, until April 2013, in about 600 full papers, 172 out of which were published in indexed international journals with an average impact factor of 3.6 and a substantial number of citations (1665).
Among the BIAL Foundation fellows is worth highlighting the presence of scientists from prestigious universities from the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, Russia, Germany, Japan, France, Canada, and many others.
The BIAL grants are promoted biannually.

Reference code: PT/FB/BL-2016
Location: BF-GMS
Title:
2016 Grants
Start date: 2017-01

Reference code: PT/FB/BL-2016-264
Location: BF-GMS
Title:
264 - The influence of maternal bonding in neuroimmune synaptic sculpting
Duration: 2017-01 - 2020-09
Researcher(s):
Ana Luísa Cardoso, João Peça, Joana Guedes, Ana Silvestre Cardoso, Ana Viegas, Elisabete Ferreiro
Institution(s): Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal)
Contents: Contents:
Application form
Correspondence
Research Funding Agreement
Progress report
Final report
Author: Cardoso, A. L.
Secondary author(s):
Peça, J., Guedes, J., Cardoso, A. S., Viegas, A. , Ferreiro, E.
Number of reproductions:
1
Keywords:
Maternal bonding / Pre-frontal cortex / Synaptic pruning / Neuroimmunity / Psychophysiology

Reference code: PT/FB/BL-2016-264.04
Location: BF-GMS
Title:
The impact of early life stress throughout life: Maternal separation-induced changes in behavior and microglia morphology
Publication year: 2018
URL:
http://hdl.handle.net/10316/82809
Abstract/Results: ABSTRACT:
Childhood exposure to stress in forms of abuse or neglect is common worldwide. Reports have demonstrated that early life stress is associated with overall volume loss, as well as with reduced neuronal density in several brain regions. Furthermore, an increasingly number of clinical studies have demonstrated a clear relationship between stressful events in the early-life period and neuropsychiatric/neurodevelopmental disorders such as depression, autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, psychosis and post-traumatic stress disorders.The mechanisms underlying this relationship are not clear, but microglia cells have been suggested as mediators of the interaction between stress and alterations in neuronal circuits, which underly these pathologies. These cells, that until recently were believed to remain in a resting state until challenged, are now known to participate in several neurodevelopmental processes essential for correct formation of the brain network. Being a part of the immune system, microglia cells are very sensitive to environmental cues and pro-inflammatory stimulus such as stress in early-life stages. Moreover, alterations in these cells during the critical periods of development lead to impairments in microglia-mediated processes and these impairments have already been correlated with neuronal circuit alterations. However, most of these mechanisms have only been described in male animals, with little information available concerning the impact of early-life stress in the sexual dysmorphism that is present during brain development under physiological conditions.The present study aimed to investigate the impact of early-life stress in microglia morphology, density and function in the medial prefrontal cortex, a brain region known to be particularly relevant in processes such as complex cognitive function, decision making and social cognition, as well as its impact in social and anxiety-like behaviors during adolescence, focusing in the differences between genders. Our results revealed that early-life stress causes alterations in social behavior and triggers depressive and risk-taking behaviors in male adolescent animals but not in females. In addition, exposure to this type of stress led a general activation of microglia cells and to opposite changes in microglia density and morphology in both genders, highlighting the sexual dysmorphic characteristics of these cells. Although further investigation in this subject is still warranted, we hypothesize that the differences observed in microglia phenotype can contribute to the increase resilience observed in females following stress in early-life, a result that might help clarify the different incidence of several neuropsychiatric disorders between genders.
Accessibility: Document does not exist in file
Language:
eng
Author:
Costa, J.
Document type:
Master's thesis
Number of reproductions:
1
Reference:
Costa, J. (2018). The impact of early life stress throughout life: Maternal separation-induced changes in behavior and microglia morphology (Master's thesis in Biomedical Investigation, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10316/82809
Indexed document: No
Keywords: Neuropsychiatric and Neurodevelopmental disorders / Early-life stress / Microglia / Neuroinflamation / Maternal Separation

DocumentLong-term impact of early life stress on adult social behavior and prefrontal cortical circuits2018

Reference code: PT/FB
Entity holding: BIAL Foundation
Location: S. Mamede do Coronado
Title:
BIAL Foundation Archive
Start date: 1994
History:
The BIAL Foundation was created in 1994 by Laboratórios BIAL in conjunction with the Council of Rectors of Portuguese Universities. BIAL’s Foundation mission is to foster the scientific study of Man from both the physical and spiritual perspectives.
Along the years the BIAL Foundation has developed an important relationship with the scientific community, first in Portugal and after worldwide. Today it is an institution of reference which aims to stimulate new researches that may help people, promote more health and contribute to new milestones to gain access to knowledge.
Among its activities the BIAL Foundation manages the BIAL Award, created in 1984, one of the most important awards in the Health field in Europe. The BIAL Award rewards both the basic and the clinical research distinguishing works of major impact in medical research.
The BIAL Foundation also assigns Scientific Research Scholarships for the study of neurophysiological and mental health in people, arousing the interest of researchers in the areas of Psychophysiology and Parapsychology.
To date the BIAL Foundation has supported 461 projects, more than 1000 researchers, with research groups in twenty-seven countries, resulting, until April 2013, in about 600 full papers, out of which 172 published in indexed international journals with an average impact factor of 3.6 and a substantial number of citations (1665).
Since 1996 the BIAL Foundation organizes the Symposia entitled "Behind and Beyond the Brain", a Forum that gathers well renowned neurosciences speakers and the BIAL Foundation Fellows which are spread around the world.
Classified as an institution of public utility, the BIAL Foundation includes among its patrons the Portuguese President, the Portuguese Universities Rectors' Council and the Portuguese Medical Association.
URL: http://www.bial.com/pt/
Accessibility: By permission

Reference code: PT/FB/BL
Entity holding: BIAL Foundation
Title: BIAL Grants
Start date: 1994
History:
In 1994 the BIAL Foundation launched a programme of science research grants with the aim of encouraging the research into Man’s physical and mental processes, namely in fields still largely unexplored but which warrant further scientific analysis, as Psychophysiology and Parapsychology.
Since its launch, applications to the BIAL grants have been increasing. Up to now 461 projects have been supported, involving more than 1000 researchers from 27 countries.
The approved applications have benefited from grants in amounts comprised between €5,000 and €50, 000. The amount to be granted is fixed by the Scientific board according to the needs of each project.
The supported projects have originated, until April 2013, in about 600 full papers, 172 out of which were published in indexed international journals with an average impact factor of 3.6 and a substantial number of citations (1665).
Among the BIAL Foundation fellows is worth highlighting the presence of scientists from prestigious universities from the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, Russia, Germany, Japan, France, Canada, and many others.
The BIAL grants are promoted biannually.

Reference code: PT/FB/BL-2016
Location: BF-GMS
Title:
2016 Grants
Start date: 2017-01

Reference code: PT/FB/BL-2016-264
Location: BF-GMS
Title:
264 - The influence of maternal bonding in neuroimmune synaptic sculpting
Duration: 2017-01 - 2020-09
Researcher(s):
Ana Luísa Cardoso, João Peça, Joana Guedes, Ana Silvestre Cardoso, Ana Viegas, Elisabete Ferreiro
Institution(s): Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal)
Contents: Contents:
Application form
Correspondence
Research Funding Agreement
Progress report
Final report
Author: Cardoso, A. L.
Secondary author(s):
Peça, J., Guedes, J., Cardoso, A. S., Viegas, A. , Ferreiro, E.
Number of reproductions:
1
Keywords:
Maternal bonding / Pre-frontal cortex / Synaptic pruning / Neuroimmunity / Psychophysiology

Reference code: PT/FB/BL-2016-264.06
Location: BF-GMS
Title:
Long-term impact of early life stress on adult social behavior and prefrontal cortical circuits
Publication year: 2018
URL:
http://hdl.handle.net/10316/87415
Abstract/Results: ABSTRACT:
Prolonged exposure to stressful conditions in early life imparts changes to physiology and health and may trigger or exacerbate neuropsychiatric disorders. Overt dysfunction in sociability is also a hallmark of disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia. Likewise, abnormal social interaction in otherwise healthy individuals is itself a trigger for mental health disorders. In addition, for most social animals, the relative position an individual occupies in its social hierarchy strongly modulates psychosocial stress. Early life stress (ELS) induced by maternal separation is acknowledged to have long-term effects on animal behavior and is considered one of the most potent, naturally-occurring stressors. In humans, childhood adversity, neglect or mistreatment is known to increase the risk for psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety. In rodent models of maternal separation, behavioral deficits are observed in emotional behavior and stress responses. At the same time, neurological dysfunctions have been identified in both humans and mice exposed to ELS. However, the precise neuronal substrates and mechanisms that traduce ELS into altered neuronal activity and subsequent social dysfunction in adulthood are poorly understood. While the role of stress impacting adult animals and promoting changes to social behavior and social hierarchies is well described, the influence of ELS on adult social hierarchical rank and social behaviors remains largely unknown. Our results uncovered that ELS induces a dysfunction in social hierarchy and social interactions in mice. We observed that ELS mice display a lower social rank when compared to control animals and are more easily defeated in dominant-subordinate competitions. ELS also led to long-lasting functional alterations in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), as evidenced by an increased c-fos expression in response to social dominance stimuli. Additionally, neuronal atrophy and increased inhibitory synaptic strength were observed in mPFC neurons from adult mice that experience ELS. In terms of gene expression in the mPFC, we found that the mRNA of Npy1r was upregulated in ELS mice and also in wild-type subordinate animals, suggesting a role for this gene in behaviors regulating social dominance. Together, our data suggests that ELS leads to long-lasting alterations in gene expression and to altered mPFC activity, inducing a subordinate behavior within a social hierarchy. Lastly, we proposed Npy1r signaling as a key modulator of social rank and a potential therapeutic target for social dysfunctions.
Accessibility: Document does not exist in file
Language:
eng
Author:
Franco, L.
Document type:
Doctoral thesis
Number of reproductions:
1
Reference:
Franco, L. (2018). Long-term impact of early life stress on adult social behavior and prefrontal cortical circuits (Doctoral thesis in Experimental Biology and Biomedicine, Instituto de Investigação Interdisciplinar da Universidade de Coimbra). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10316/87415
Indexed document: No
Keywords: Early life stress / Social hierarchy / Maternal separation / Social subordination / mPFC dysfunction / Npy1r

DocumentMaternal separation impairs long term-potentiation in CA1-CA3 synapses and hippocampal-dependent memory in old rats2014

Reference code: PT/FB
Entity holding: BIAL Foundation
Location: S. Mamede do Coronado
Title:
BIAL Foundation Archive
Start date: 1994
History:
The BIAL Foundation was created in 1994 by Laboratórios BIAL in conjunction with the Council of Rectors of Portuguese Universities. BIAL’s Foundation mission is to foster the scientific study of Man from both the physical and spiritual perspectives.
Along the years the BIAL Foundation has developed an important relationship with the scientific community, first in Portugal and after worldwide. Today it is an institution of reference which aims to stimulate new researches that may help people, promote more health and contribute to new milestones to gain access to knowledge.
Among its activities the BIAL Foundation manages the BIAL Award, created in 1984, one of the most important awards in the Health field in Europe. The BIAL Award rewards both the basic and the clinical research distinguishing works of major impact in medical research.
The BIAL Foundation also assigns Scientific Research Scholarships for the study of neurophysiological and mental health in people, arousing the interest of researchers in the areas of Psychophysiology and Parapsychology.
To date the BIAL Foundation has supported 461 projects, more than 1000 researchers, with research groups in twenty-seven countries, resulting, until April 2013, in about 600 full papers, out of which 172 published in indexed international journals with an average impact factor of 3.6 and a substantial number of citations (1665).
Since 1996 the BIAL Foundation organizes the Symposia entitled "Behind and Beyond the Brain", a Forum that gathers well renowned neurosciences speakers and the BIAL Foundation Fellows which are spread around the world.
Classified as an institution of public utility, the BIAL Foundation includes among its patrons the Portuguese President, the Portuguese Universities Rectors' Council and the Portuguese Medical Association.
URL: http://www.bial.com/pt/
Accessibility: By permission

Reference code: PT/FB/BL
Entity holding: BIAL Foundation
Title: BIAL Grants
Start date: 1994
History:
In 1994 the BIAL Foundation launched a programme of science research grants with the aim of encouraging the research into Man’s physical and mental processes, namely in fields still largely unexplored but which warrant further scientific analysis, as Psychophysiology and Parapsychology.
Since its launch, applications to the BIAL grants have been increasing. Up to now 461 projects have been supported, involving more than 1000 researchers from 27 countries.
The approved applications have benefited from grants in amounts comprised between €5,000 and €50, 000. The amount to be granted is fixed by the Scientific board according to the needs of each project.
The supported projects have originated, until April 2013, in about 600 full papers, 172 out of which were published in indexed international journals with an average impact factor of 3.6 and a substantial number of citations (1665).
Among the BIAL Foundation fellows is worth highlighting the presence of scientists from prestigious universities from the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, Russia, Germany, Japan, France, Canada, and many others.
The BIAL grants are promoted biannually.

Reference code: PT/FB/BL-2010
Location: Arquivo PCA - Pastas 1 a 23
Title:
2010 Grants
Start date: 2011-01

Reference code: PT/FB/BL-2010-119
Location: Arquivo PCA - Pasta 21/2010
Title:
119 - Psychophysiological indicators of stress reactivity and disease adaptation: Attachment styles, coping and emotions regulation
Duration: 2011-03 - 2015-09
Researcher(s):
Sílvia Ouakinin, Luísa Maria Vaqueiro Lopes, Susana Filipa Gonçalves Eusébio, Marco Alberto Vicente Barreto Torrado, Isabel Maria Rolão Nabais, Graça Maria Vilhena da Cruz Gonçalves Costa Diogo
Institution(s): Centro Multidisplinar de Psicopatologia Barahona Fernandes, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal)
Contents: Contents:
Bursary agreement
Application form
Correspondence
Financial report and expenditure documents
Progress report
Master´s power point presentation
2 Articles (previous version)
2 Conference abstract
Final report
Language: por
Author:
Ouakinin, S.
Secondary author(s):
Lopes, L., Eusébio, S., Torrado, M., Nabais, I., Diogo, G.
Number of reproductions:
1
Keywords:
Psychophysiology / Stress and health / Affective and social behavior / Attachment / Biopsychological problems / Diseases/Injuries

Reference code: PT/FB/BL-2010-119.12
Location: Arquivo PCA - Pasta 21/2010
Title:
Maternal separation impairs long term-potentiation in CA1-CA3 synapses and hippocampal-dependent memory in old rats
Publication year: 2014
URL:
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0197458014000414?via%3Dihub
Abstract/Results: ABSTRACT:
Exposure to chronic stress during the neonatal period is known to induce permanent long-term changes in the central nervous system and hipothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity that are associated with increased levels of depression, anxiety, and cognitive impairments. In rodents, a validated model of early life stress is the maternal separation (MS) paradigm, which has been shown to have long-term consequences for the pups that span to adulthood. We hypothesized that the early life stress-associated effects could be exacerbated with aging, because it is often accompanied by cognitive decline. Using a MS model in which rat pups were separated from their mothers for 3 hours daily, during postnatal days 2-14, we evaluated the long-term functional consequences to aged animals (70-week-old), by measuring synaptic plasticity and cognitive performance. The baseline behavioral deficits of aged control rats were further exacerbated in MS animals, indicating that early-life stress induces sustained changes in anxiety-like behavior and hippocampal-dependent memory that are maintained much later in life. We then investigated whether these differences are linked to impaired function of hippocampal neurons by recording hippocampal long-term potentiation from Schaffer collaterals/CA1 synapses. The magnitude of the hippocampal long-term potentiation induced by high-frequency stimulation was significantly lower in aged MS animals than in age-matched controls. These results substantiate the hypothesis that the neuronal and endocrine alterations induced by early-life stress are long lasting, and are able to exacerbate the mild age-associated deficits.
Accessibility: Document does not exist in file
Language:
eng
Author:
Sousa, V. C.
Secondary author(s):
Vital, J., Costenla, A. R., Batalha, V. L., Sebastião, A. M., Ribeiro, J. A., Lopes, L. V.
Document type:
Article
Number of reproductions:
1
Percentiles:
5
Reference:
Sousa, V. C., Vital, J., Costenla, A. R., Batalha, V. L., Sebastião, A. M., Ribeiro, J. A., & Lopes, L. V. (2014). Maternal separation impairs long term-potentiation in CA1-CA3 synapses and hippocampal-dependent memory in old rats. Neurobiology of Aging, 35(7), 1680-1685. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2014.01.024
2-year Impact Factor: 5.013|2014
Times cited: 64|2024-02-02
Indexed document: Yes
Quartile: Q1
Keywords: Aging / Stress / Hippocampus / Memory / LTP / Maternal separation